New Jersey Colon Cancer Malpractice Lawyers

New Jersey Colon Cancer Malpractice Lawyers

Colon cancer is the second deadliest cancer, yet with regular routine screening, it is almost always preventable. Unfortunately, errors can be made during the screening procedure, and the cancer can go undetected and be misdiagnosed.

Colon Cancer Lawyer New York

Colon Cancer Can Be Lethal If Not Detected In Time or Misdiagnosed by a Doctor.

All colon cancers begin as benign, noncancerous growths called polyps. In some cases, and over quite a long period of time, the tip of the polyp may become cancerous, and if not removed early enough, may progress until the wall of the colon becomes involved. It is thought that it takes five years or more for a cancerous polyp to involve the colon wall. Once the wall of the colon is invaded by colon cancer cells, there is the strong likelihood that the cancer will spread to other organs with often deadly results.

If a potential cancer is over looked and treatment delayed, the experienced New Jersey colon cancer lawyers at Simonson Goodman Platzer PC can help. They know the law and have been helping victims of medical malpractice recover damages for decades.

Colon Cancer Malpractice

A colonoscopy is the most effective colon cancer screening test in use today. During a colonoscopy, a fiber optic scope with a mini-camera is inserted into the rectum and guided through the length of the colon in an attempt to identify polyps or early cancers. In order for this screening to be effective in allowing a close=up view of the colon wall, a pre-test colon cleanse must adequately empty the colon by inducing diarrhea.

If there is adequate preparation and the colonoscopy is properly performed, almost every polyp and early cancer should be identified and removed. Colon cancer malpractice may occur when the doctor realizes that the colonoscopy prep was inadequate due to stool blocking a good view of the colon wall, yet continues the procedure and misses something that needed to be removed. A year or so may go by, the patient begins to have symptoms, and further testing reveals a colon cancer that probably was there at the time of the previous colonoscopy. If this should happen to you or a loved one, contact the New Jersey Colon Cancer Malpractice Lawyers at Simonson Goodman Platzer PC as soon as possible.

Incomplete Colonoscopy Can Cause Colon Cancer Malpractice.

Another kind of New Jersey colon cancer malpractice occurs when the gastroenterologist performs an inadequate or incomplete colonoscopy and misses a cancerous mass. In a case like this, the doctor likely failed to pass the scope far enough into the colon and missed a cancer in an area that should have been explored.

Typical Case of New Jersey Colon Cancer Malpractice

A typical case of New Jersey colon cancer malpractice happens when a doctor fails to perform a colonoscopy when one is necessary, and thereby fails to identify a treatable cancer. An example of this type of case might be a patient who has some blood in his stool, or who is chronically constipated, or has chronic diarrhea, and yet the primary care doctor fails to recommend a colonoscopy or referral to a specialist. If it turns out that the patient has a colon cancer that has spread, this is a case for the New Jersey colon cancer malpractice lawyers at Simonson Goodman Platzer PC.

Cases can also arise when a primary care doctor fails to recommend routine screening at a proper time or interval or when a gastroenterologist fails to recommend further testing when something suspicious is seen New Jersey allows a colon cancer malpractice case to be started within two years of reasonable knowledge of the existence of malpractice, which is typically when the cancer diagnosis takes place. If you suspect that you, a family member or friend may have been a victim of New Jersey colon cancer malpractice, contact the New Jersey colon cancer malpractice lawyers at Simonson Goodman Platzer PC as soon as possible to schedule your free consultation with an expert in New Jersey colon cancer malpractice.